Botanicals

Reintroducing our Incense blends

We have recently expanded our collection of loose incense blends, so it felt like a good time to reintroduce you to the whole collection. All blends are combinations of leaves, petals, buds, bark and resin we have lovingly grown and foraged locally. We gather our plants at their most abundant and dry carefully to preserve their potency all with great care and respect to nature.


Botanical Incense Blend

Our signature blend was created to celebrate the beauty and magic of the complete seasonal cycle. This blend evolves throughout the seasons to include plants at their most vibrant and abundant.

Combining the refreshing woodland evergreens of Autumn and Winter with Spring’s exquisite blossoms and the warming aromas of Summer’s herbs and flowers.

This blend can be especially helpful when we are feeling disconnected, ungrounded or uninspired. Ideal to accompany any self care practice.


Forest Incense Blend

This blend celebrates the warming and magical aroma of Western Red Cedar (Thuja plicata) and the energies of the deep forest.

Cedar encourages connection to our inner vision, and we recommend burning this blend whilst journaling, creating vision boards, intention setting, new moon ceremonies or when needing support with new beginnings or projects.

A blend of Cedar leaf, bark and cones gathered from local wind fallen branches and beautifully golden resin gathered respectfully.


Sun Incense Blend

A warming blend of plants associated with the sun and the fire element, crafted during Summer’s peak at Lammas.

Use when you want to feel energised, uplifted, abundant, confident and connected. Ideal for mornings, intention setting, new beginnings and solar festivals.


Moon Incense Blend

A dreamy blend of plants associated with the moon and the water element, crafted under the light of the full moon.

Use when you want to unwind, soothe frayed emotions, encourage flow and connect with your intuition. Ideal for evenings, moon rituals, dream work, meditation and reflection practices.

Wellbeing

Lessons from a Primrose

After a shaky few days, taking my morning cup of tea out in the garden this morning felt like an act of restoration. Walking barefoot across the lawn, moving from the shade into the sun I came to sit down in front of a small patch of Primroses. I noticed that the petals of most of the flowers were wilting now, nibbled (not by me) and turning brown in patches as they were reaching the end of their blooming period here in the UK.

Their name translates from the Latin meaning ‘first’ and these little pioneers led the way, opening their delicate yellow petals to a cold and tired world just a few months before. To the earliest of Spring days they brought a reminder of renewal and hope from the woodland floors.

They hold such an important role in our ecosystem – as an indicator of ancient woodland they offer an important early nectar source for insects, most notably brimstone and small tortoiseshell butterflies.

As I spent time observing these precious little gems this morning, I became aware of their niche. Flowering early, they bring joy and valuable nectar sources before they become overshadowed by larger plants on the woodland floor. They don’t bloom all year round, or attempt to be like another flower. They just bloom when conditions are good for them and then retreat when they are not.

As a human being, I often find myself trying to fulfil so many roles. An array of options are always available to us that it can be easy to stray from our true nature, or feel less than in comparison with others. Do you sometimes feel as though you should always be blooming, or be more like someone else? If so, perhaps spend a few moments just observing a plant in nature and be reminded of her lessons of embracing our individuality and niche. Just another little dose of nature’s medicine, always available to us.

With love and plant magick,

Nicola

Wellbeing, Wheel of the Year

Beltane

The next festival in our Wheel of the Year journey is Beltane or May day, celebrated From the evening of April 30th to May 1st in the Northern hemisphere. Beltane is the peak of Spring, a celebration of fertility and the height of the earth’s growing energy. At this time of year we begin to see the very first signs of Summer emerging.

This is a time of abundance, union and life force. Flowers are blooming, new life is being born and the Sun’s strength is increasing. This is a fertile time in the natural world, and can help us to ignite projects, cultivate new actions and reflect on what we need to bloom. This increase in active energy, can leave us feeling a little worn out at times, so it is good time to ensure rest, self care and nourishment is established to balance this busy time.

Our Beltane Seasonal Wellbeing guide is available now with journal prompts and guided practices to help you connect with the energy of the season.

Beltane blessings!

Wellbeing, Wheel of the Year

Imbolc

Traditionally celebrated over 1st and 2nd of February in the Northern Hemisphere, Imbolc marks the earliest signs of Spring and falls midway between the Winter Solstice and the Spring Equinox. At this time, the earth is beginning to awaken from Winter’s slumber. Light is increasing, encouraging changes in the behaviour of our animal friends. Most growth is still occurring in the darkness of the Earth’s belly but some little pioneer plants bloom first, signalling the quickening of the year.

Imbolc is a period of transition. The inward focus of the Winter months making way to a more external focus of growth once again. A tender time where we tentatively begin looking outwards towards the coming months. It can feel challenging or overwhelming particularly if we are feeling under nourished.

This can be a good time to assess where we require more rest or support. To clear space in our homes and lives to make way for what’s to come. And to reflect on the things that light us up, restore our energy and tend to our ground ready to welcome the tender new shoots of Spring.

For guided Mindfulness practices and journal prompts inspired by the season of Imbolc, you can download our Imbolc Wellbeing Guide now.

Wellbeing, Wheel of the Year

Winter Solstice

We have now arrived at the darkest day of the year in the Northern hemisphere. Energy and light levels are low. Today the sun stands still at its furthest point, before slowly returning once more with its light and warmth.

It has been a strange year, perhaps the strangest so far so we do hope you find some moments over this time to rest, and tend to yourselves.

Alongside our Winter Solstice/Yule Wellbeing Guide, we have also filmed a short Mindful Moment in Nature video which you can find a link to in the guide.

We have created these with love, to capture the peace we experience in nature and hope they support you too.

Botanicals

Mindful Jars

We wanted to introduce you to our newest creation, our Mindful Jar trio.

These little glass jars are full of homegrown and wild foraged botanicals intended to bring you a mindful moment at home, work or on the go.

Our senses have long been used in mindfulness & grounding practices. They offer us a route back to the present moment when our minds have wandered, our focus is lost or we are experiencing anxiety, worry or feel ungrounded.

By bringing our attention to what we can feel, smell and see in our surroundings unites us back to the present moment.

Smell in particular is a powerful sense and can impact our wellbeing. Certain smells can lift our mood, evoke positive memories or energize our bodies.

With this in mind we wanted to create a visual and aromatic aid that can support us with grounding and connecting with the present moment.


Our Mindful Jar trio includes:

  • Cedar to ground, protect & uplift
  • Lavender, Rose, wild Chamomile & Feverfew to calm, soothe & nurture
  • Pine, Lemon Verbena, Eucalyptus & Mint to revive, awaken & invigorate

You can find our Mindful Jar trio in our Etsy store now

Wellbeing, Wheel of the Year

Samhain

Samhain is a seasonal festival that falls roughly half way between the Autumn Equinox and the Winter Solstice. It is the third harvest festival (following Lammas and Autumn Equinox) celebrating the time to collect the last of the year’s berries and nuts. Samhain is the end of the growth part of the cycle and the origin of Halloween. It can be thought of as the birth of the Winter and dark half of the year.

As the light wanes, this time of year is associated with an increase in darkness, a time where the seed has now fallen deep into the dark earth and rests before it begins a new cycle of life. Trees and plants let go of their old growth and we may feel a call to honour people and things that have been lost.

We can sometimes find this time of year somewhat uncomfortable. Generally society and us humans have a preference for the warmth, light and growth. Death and decay, whilst essential can be painful and something we may wish to avoid.

Aligning ourselves with the seasons, is to learn the lessons of the natural world. To practice letting go of things, allowing them to nourish new parts of us and our lives.

Connecting to the cycle of the seasons can help us to reflect on changes in our own mood and energy which naturally ebbs and flows. We have created a new seasonal guide for the Samhain season that runs from 31st October up to the Winter Solstice on 21st December. You can download it below. It includes a mindfulness practice and journal prompts that can be used at any time throughout the season. If you do find this helpful, or wish to share any insights you have whilst using the guide we would love to hear from you.

Samhain blessings

Wellbeing, Wheel of the Year

Autumn Equinox

As the Wheel of the Year reaches the Autumn Equinox on September 22nd, day and night length reaches equal balance once more as we pass through the doorway to the dark half of the year. After this point, the balance tips as hours of darkness increase and day length shortens. This heralds a time to begin slowing down, give thanks for what we harvest, release the old and turn our gaze inwards.

In astronomical terms, the Autumn Equinox marks the beginning of the Autumn season in the Northern hemisphere. The Autumn Equinox is thought of as the second of three harvests of the year; the fruit harvest. This time is also referred to as the festival of Mabon.

The word ‘equinox’ comes from the Latin word meaning ‘equal night’ and twice a year, on both the Spring and Autumn equinoxes, night and day length are in balance. The light has slowly but surely been declining from its highest point at the Summer Solstice in June. It will now continue to decline, until it reaches its lowest point on our shortest day at the Winter Solstice on December 21st.

At this moment of balance between the dark and the light, it can be a good time to pause and consider the balance in our own lives. Energy being extended to others compared with the energy being spent on ourselves. Focus on our outward goals and future, compared with our internal world and present.

The is also a good time to pause and take stock of our year so far. What has gone well? Where may we need to clear out or make space.

In general the darker colder months can be thought of as a time to rest and restore. Return to our roots. Focus inward. carving out some time and physical space where you can build a meditation or journal practice to support you for the winter, make your surroundings more cosy, and let go on anything no longer needed in the months ahead.

Connecting to the cycle of the seasons can help us to reflect on changes in our own mood and energy which naturally ebbs and flows. We have created a new seasonal guide for the Autumn Equinox season that runs from 22nd September up to Samhain on 31st October. You can download it below. It includes a mindfulness practice and journal prompts that can be used at any time throughout the season. If you do find this helpful, or wish to share any insights you have whilst using the guide we would love to hear from you.

Mabon blessings

Wellbeing, Wheel of the Year

Creating a space

One of my earliest indicators that Autumn is nearby is my desire to retreat. Woodland walks followed by cosy, quiet evenings, warming foods and the urge to make my space feel cosier and more relaxing.

In my previous post about transitioning to Autumn I discussed how typically this time of year can bring with it a more quiet and reflective energy that guides us inwards, as opposed to the bright and expansive days of the Spring and Summer months just ending.

As well as the call to make my general environment feel cosier at this time of year (blankets, candles, slippers at the ready) I also find myself wanting to create a more dedicated space where I can connect to my inner self through yoga, meditation, reading, reflecting or journalling. Having a dedicated space to quieten the mind can help us to strengthen and commit to our practices, especially if it feels soothing and inviting to be there and doesn’t require setting up each time.

Some people use the word ‘altar’ to describe a focused sacred space, but it can be whatever feels meaningful to you. I have been lucky enough to have a whole summer house as a dedicated meditation room in an old house. Now whilst we are staying with family I have a chest of drawers in front of where I place my yoga mat. I have also used a shelf or a windowsill to put things that are meaningful to me. The key is the intention that your space holds. Things precious to you. Things that have meaning and support you to practice self care. Things that help you to reflect, quieten your mind and encourage you to return often and feel safe.

I would love to hear about any pulls you have as Autumn approaches, and also whether you find having a space supportive. We will be continuing to share suggestions to help you connect to our new season ahead, in the run up to the Autumn Equinox.