Botanicals

Reintroducing our Incense blends

We have recently expanded our collection of loose incense blends, so it felt like a good time to reintroduce you to the whole collection. All blends are combinations of leaves, petals, buds, bark and resin we have lovingly grown and foraged locally. We gather our plants at their most abundant and dry carefully to preserve their potency all with great care and respect to nature.


Botanical Incense Blend

Our signature blend was created to celebrate the beauty and magic of the complete seasonal cycle. This blend evolves throughout the seasons to include plants at their most vibrant and abundant.

Combining the refreshing woodland evergreens of Autumn and Winter with Spring’s exquisite blossoms and the warming aromas of Summer’s herbs and flowers.

This blend can be especially helpful when we are feeling disconnected, ungrounded or uninspired. Ideal to accompany any self care practice.


Forest Incense Blend

This blend celebrates the warming and magical aroma of Western Red Cedar (Thuja plicata) and the energies of the deep forest.

Cedar encourages connection to our inner vision, and we recommend burning this blend whilst journaling, creating vision boards, intention setting, new moon ceremonies or when needing support with new beginnings or projects.

A blend of Cedar leaf, bark and cones gathered from local wind fallen branches and beautifully golden resin gathered respectfully.


Sun Incense Blend

A warming blend of plants associated with the sun and the fire element, crafted during Summer’s peak at Lammas.

Use when you want to feel energised, uplifted, abundant, confident and connected. Ideal for mornings, intention setting, new beginnings and solar festivals.


Moon Incense Blend

A dreamy blend of plants associated with the moon and the water element, crafted under the light of the full moon.

Use when you want to unwind, soothe frayed emotions, encourage flow and connect with your intuition. Ideal for evenings, moon rituals, dream work, meditation and reflection practices.

Botanicals

How we Burn our Loose Incense Blends

Burning incense is an ancient art that has been practiced across the world for many thousands of years. Long before our ability to extract the essential oils from plants, burning the whole dried plant would have been the earliest form of aromatherapy.

Incense burning was common place in hospitals, places of worship and the home to promote health, clean the air, enhance meditation and spiritual practices, in celebration or remembrance or to cultivate a sense of protection and grounding.

Incense comes in many forms and our loose incense blends combine a mixture of resin, bark, leaves, flowers and cones that we have grown or sustainably foraged from around Cambridgeshire.

We have had many questions about how to use our incense blends so we wanted to provide some more information in this post.


Our favourite way to burn our loose incense blends is using a mesh burner like this one for everyday use. Ours is from Ayurveda 101

You can also add a pinch of loose incense to a charcoal disk in a burner for ceremonial use outdoors or in a well ventilated area


There are other ways to enjoy loose incense too. For a very gentle fragrance, the dry blend can be added to a standard incense burner (non mesh, above a tealight candle) which will release the oils from the plants and emit a gentle calming scent.

Alternatively, you do not need to burn the blend at all to enjoy the plant energies. You can carry your tin with you for a grounding tool that can be breathed in to calm and relax you throughout the day.

Now available in our Etsy store

Botanicals

Rosemary

As another warming evergreen, Rosemary is a wonderful Winter ally and complements Thyme extremely well. Both of these herbs bring great benefits to our health, as well as attracting wildlife to our garden during Spring and Summer months.

The name Rosemary is derived from the Latin – Ros marinus meaning ‘dew of the sea‘ as it tends to grow in close proximity to the sea in its native area of the Mediterranean.

Rosemary is a circulatory stimulant that increases blood flow to the brain. It has long been recognised for its positive impact on memory and cognition. Various research has demonstrated that smelling Rosemary improves memory and performance in mental arithmetic.

The stimulating qualities also benefit the hair and scalp, increasing hair growth and shine and its wealth of antioxidants support skin, heart and joint health.

As a nervine, Rosemary can help ease tension in the stomach and stress related headaches, as well as supporting mental fatigue, stress and depression. In one study, workers who began drinking Rosemary tea regularly, reported feeling significantly less burned out compared with colleagues who didn’t drink the tea.


Ways to enjoy Rosemary

  • Rosemary adds a delicious touch to meals – we especially love it with roasted potatoes and a vegetable stew.
  • Rosemary tea is a simple way to enjoy its benefits. Steep a few stems in boiling water. It can be drunk alone or combined with Thyme for extra uplifting support especially for colds and respiratory illnesses.
  • Inhaling the steam of Rosemary can be both uplifting and energising and help soothe tension headaches.
  • Rosemary makes a wonderful hair rinse. You can either steep the Rosemary in boiling water and use cooled for a final rinse or infuse the Rosemary in apple cider vinegar for a few weeks, strain and dilute for an extra nourishing hair rinse.
  • Rosemary makes a warming joint rub, when infused in a nourishing oil and rubbed into aching joints and muscles.
  • Rosemary has long been used as an incense, it has a beautiful aroma and can be burned for protection, cleansing a space or in remembrance of a loved one.

When working with any plants it is important to do your own research to ensure they work for you. Rosemary is not recommended during pregnancy above culinary use and is not recommended for use when taking certain medications.

Botanicals

Thyme for tea

The Winter months can be a good time to really reconnect with some of our evergreen aromatic garden herbs. This month I have found myself particularly drawn to using Thyme, so thought it would be nice to begin a herbal journey focusing on it.

Thyme is thought to derive its name from the Greek words ‘thymos’ meaning strong and ‘thyein’ meaning to make a burnt offering, highlighting its ancient use as an incense.

Thyme is rich in the active ingredient ‘thymol’ which has powerful antiseptic properties. So much so, the compound has been isolated and used in high doses in a range of commercial products including medical disinfectants.

Thyme is a warming and dry herb that has long been used to help respiratory conditions such as bronchitis, laryngitis, tonsillitis, asthma and mouth conditions such as gum disease. Its astringent and decongestant properties support the clearing of excess mucous from the body.

It is also celebrated for its support of the digestive system, helping with indigestion, diarrhoea, gas and calming the stomach, particularly symptoms of nervous tension in the gut.

As a nervine, Thyme has been used to help support physical and mental exhaustion, relieve tension, anxiety and depression and externally this warming herb can offer relief for joint and muscle pain, cleaning and wound healing.

How I like to enjoy Thyme currently:


  1. My favourite way to enjoy Thyme is simply in a tea. Steeping a few stems in boiling water for around 10 minutes, I enjoy drinking thyme solo, or mixed with other herbs or a spoon of honey. You can also gargle with this tea when you have a sore throat.
  2. Thyme can also be effective when used for steam inhalation to clear airways and uplift our senses. Add thyme either solo or with other herbs to a bowl of boiling water. Allow to steep under a towel for 10 minutes. Then begin to gently breath in the steam with your head under the towel for up to 10 minutes.
  3. I love adding Thyme to a range of dishes including tomato sauces, to roasted vegetables and soups and stews.
  4. One of Thyme’s oldest uses is as an incense. It can be thrown into a fire, popped on top of a wood burner or left to dry and then burned to obtain the healing smoke. I like to add it in to smoulder sticks. My recent Winter Allies Smoulder Stick was woven with thyme and other evergreens.
  5. The other way I have used Thyme recently is in a multipurpose cleaner, which is simply a selection of evergreens infused in white vinegar, left for 2 weeks and then strained and diluted 1:1 with distilled water.


We would love to hear the ways in which you enjoy using Thyme. As with all plants it is always important to do your own research. Thyme and certain other herbs are not recommended for use in pregnancy.