Botanicals

Bay

Just like the other aromatic herbs that we have covered in our herb explorations so far, Bay (Laurus nobilis) not only enhances the flavour of our dishes but helps us to digest them. Culinary herbs, such as Sage, Rosemary, Thyme and Bay all have properties that help stimulate our digestion and helps calm the stomach, easing gas and cramps. These herbs, including Bay also help to ease symptoms of coughs and colds.

Bay leaves have been used therapeutically for thousands of years. Like Lavender, Bay leaves contain Linalool a compound with relaxing properties when inhaled. Bay is also an antirheumatic and can help ease arthritic aches and pains.

Bay is associated with the Sun. Symbolically it represents triumph and victory. Thought to arise from Greek mythology, the laurel wreath, made of Bay leaves has long been used to crown successors from sports events to graduates. The term ‘laureato’ in Italian, referring to a student that has graduated. The evergreen is also thought to protect the home.


Ways to enjoy Bay

  1. Like the other culinary herbs, fresh or dried Bay leaves can be added to many dishes to enhance the flavour and help improve digestion.
  2. Steep a couple of Bay leaves in boiling water to enjoy its soothing properties. Leave for 10 minutes and enjoy as a tea.
  3. Burning dried Bay leaves can help calm the mind and body.
  4. Make a decoction of Bay leaves by gently boiling a handful in water for around 30 minutes and then add the water into a bath to help arthritic pain. Alternatively heat leaves gently in an oil such as sunflower to infuse and once cool enough, rub into sore muscles.

We always love to hear your favourite uses for herbs too, please feel free to leave us a comment.

When working with any plants it is important to do your own research to ensure they work for you. Bay is not recommended during pregnancy.

Botanicals

Sage

Onto another aromatic herb native to the Mediterranean, and now commonly grown in the garden; common Sage. The name of this plant’s genus ‘Salvia’ comes from the Latin ‘Salvare’ meaning ‘to save, or to heal.’ The plant has long been used medicinally with examples from Ancient Greece and Rome and throughout the Middle Ages where it was commonly grown around monasteries for its healing properties.

Even its culinary uses; teaming sage with rich foods (in particular meats) hint at its medicinal properties. Helping the digestion of rich foods, Sage is a tonic for the liver and aids with indigestion, bloating and flatulence.

Rich with antioxidants, the anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties of a Sage tea or gargle can be soothing for sore gums, mouth ulcers and sore throats. Its antibacterial properties have been shown to be effective at reducing plaque build up too. Teamed with Rosemary and/or Thyme they can be supportive allies for coughs and colds and make a clearing steam for airways.

Modern research has found Sage to be stimulating for cognitive function too. Compounds within common Sage have been shown to inhibit enzymes that breakdown neurotransmitters in the brain and research is ongoing into the support this may provide for individuals with Alzheimer’s.

Traditionally sage has been used to help alleviate some menopausal symptoms such as excess sweating and hot flushes.


Ways to enjoy Sage

  1. As a culinary herb Sage can be added to meals to support the digestion of rich foods.
  2. Sage tea is an easy way to enjoy its many benefits. Steep a teaspoon of dried Sage or a few fresh leaves in boiling water, cover and enjoy after around 10 minutes. Team with Rosemary for memory and Thyme for soothing sore throats.
  3. Cooled tea can be used as a gargle for sore throats, mouth ulcers or gum problems. You may also wish to add a tablespoon of Apple Cider Vinegar into your gargle too for extra support. A fresh leaf can also be rubbed directly onto a sore tooth or gum.
  4. Dried Sage is an excellent herb to burn for its cleansing properties. Using either single leaves in a fireproof dish or combing the leaves into a stick, burning Sage has long been a popular method for receiving its antimicrobial benefits.

We always love to hear your favourite uses for herbs too, please feel free to leave us a comment.

When working with any plants it is important to do your own research to ensure they work for you. Sage is not recommended during pregnancy or for individuals with epilepsy. It is also toxic in very high doses.

Botanicals

Thyme for tea

The Winter months can be a good time to really reconnect with some of our evergreen aromatic garden herbs. This month I have found myself particularly drawn to using Thyme, so thought it would be nice to begin a herbal journey focusing on it.

Thyme is thought to derive its name from the Greek words ‘thymos’ meaning strong and ‘thyein’ meaning to make a burnt offering, highlighting its ancient use as an incense.

Thyme is rich in the active ingredient ‘thymol’ which has powerful antiseptic properties. So much so, the compound has been isolated and used in high doses in a range of commercial products including medical disinfectants.

Thyme is a warming and dry herb that has long been used to help respiratory conditions such as bronchitis, laryngitis, tonsillitis, asthma and mouth conditions such as gum disease. Its astringent and decongestant properties support the clearing of excess mucous from the body.

It is also celebrated for its support of the digestive system, helping with indigestion, diarrhoea, gas and calming the stomach, particularly symptoms of nervous tension in the gut.

As a nervine, Thyme has been used to help support physical and mental exhaustion, relieve tension, anxiety and depression and externally this warming herb can offer relief for joint and muscle pain, cleaning and wound healing.

How I like to enjoy Thyme currently:


  1. My favourite way to enjoy Thyme is simply in a tea. Steeping a few stems in boiling water for around 10 minutes, I enjoy drinking thyme solo, or mixed with other herbs or a spoon of honey. You can also gargle with this tea when you have a sore throat.
  2. Thyme can also be effective when used for steam inhalation to clear airways and uplift our senses. Add thyme either solo or with other herbs to a bowl of boiling water. Allow to steep under a towel for 10 minutes. Then begin to gently breath in the steam with your head under the towel for up to 10 minutes.
  3. I love adding Thyme to a range of dishes including tomato sauces, to roasted vegetables and soups and stews.
  4. One of Thyme’s oldest uses is as an incense. It can be thrown into a fire, popped on top of a wood burner or left to dry and then burned to obtain the healing smoke. I like to add it in to smoulder sticks. My recent Winter Allies Smoulder Stick was woven with thyme and other evergreens.
  5. The other way I have used Thyme recently is in a multipurpose cleaner, which is simply a selection of evergreens infused in white vinegar, left for 2 weeks and then strained and diluted 1:1 with distilled water.


We would love to hear the ways in which you enjoy using Thyme. As with all plants it is always important to do your own research. Thyme and certain other herbs are not recommended for use in pregnancy.

Foraging, Wheel of the Year

Lammas Tea Blend

We hope that you have been able to find some time and space to connect with the new season of Lammas – also thought of as high Summer or the birth of Autumn.

One of the ways I like to connect to a new season is by creating a tea blend that seems to hold the energy of the season in the plants that I blend.

In celebration of Lammas and the abundance of edible & medicinal plants available at this time of year, we created this vibrant and flower filled mix that we enjoyed drinking in our garden around a fire last night. It was not only visually pleasing but delicious too!

Botanicals

The magic of Goldenrod

It is lovely to watch the flowers that you have planted grow, but it is extra special when they find their own way into your garden themselves, which is exactly what happened with some Goldenrod this year.

Goldenrod is known to be richer in antioxidants than green tea. Its Latin name, Solidago translates as ‘to make whole or heal’ and reflects its long use in herbal medicine. It has superb anti inflammatory action and pain relieving qualities thought to help arthritis, cold and flu symptoms and bladder & kidney problems.
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Its sunny colour produces a beautiful natural dye, and attracts much life to its nectar rich, sweet smelling flowers.
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In folklore, Goldenrod is thought to bring luck and prosperity, especially when planted near the front door (even luckier when it self seeds) so you can see the many reasons I am happy it has found it’s way into our garden this year!

We have so far enjoyed it fresh in an antioxidant rich tea, and are weaving it into some prosperity and abundance smudge sticks that will be listed in our shop once dried. As always we are leaving the majority to be enjoyed by our precious wildlife.