Botanicals

Why burn plants?

Before we had the technology to extract the essential oils from plants, burning leaves, flowers, roots and resins would have been the earliest and simplest forms of aromatherapy (the use of aromatic plant extracts for healing). The practice of burning dried plants has been carried out extensively across cultures, often but not always in connection with religious and spiritual practices.

When we burn herbs an aromatic smoke is released containing many of the beneficial compounds of the plant itself. Research suggests that burning is a fast and effective method for delivering the therapeutic properties to an individual, with different plants offering a rich variety of benefits. One study noted a 95% reduction of airborne bacteria in a room after burning a mixture of aromatic herbs with Mango or Pipal wood for an hour. A reduction of bacteria in the room was still noted up to 30 days after the burning.

As well as the therapeutic benefits that we obtain from the plant itself, the process of burning may well have its own healing benefits. Fire has long been associated with transforming energy from one state to another. Using fire imagery, or burning something can give us a sense of change, transformation or release.

Using a herb bundle combines the healing properties of the plants themselves with the transformative energy of fire. As with all forms of medicine, it is important to ensure it connects with you personally. Plants are powerful, and some people experience side effects to some plants. We always recommend doing your own research and introducing new plants gently.

We are excited to offer a new selection of smoulder sticks that will be available from our shop this week.

*As of 20/08/20 we have changed the name of our sticks to ‘Smoulder sticks.’ You can read more about our decision regarding this here.

Wellbeing, Wheel of the Year

Summer Solstice

In astronomical terms, the Summer Solstice marks the longest day of the year and the beginning of the Summer season in the Northern hemisphere . This year, the Summer Solstice falls on Saturday 20th June. As daylight hours reach their peak on this day, we begin our transition into the second half of the year. Light after the Summer Solstice slowly wanes towards the Winter Solstice, where we reach the shortest day of the year falling on December 21st.

Transitioning to the second part of the year can lead us to wonder how the months have gone, perhaps even more under the circumstances we have faced this year. Us humans commonly have a preference for daylight (not to mention the warmth) so thinking of its retreat is not always easy. However the earth, if we allow it, can be a good teacher of balance. Year on year we witness Summer and Winter rise and fall, giving way to one another through the seasonal cycle, always moving, always changing and always returning.

Being aware of what is going on in our outer world can help us to connect to and learn more about our inner worlds. In this article I will discuss how we can use the energy of the season to cultivate inner reflection and set intentions for the second part of the year.

Continue reading “Summer Solstice”