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Botanicals

Sage

Onto another aromatic herb native to the Mediterranean, and now commonly grown in the garden; common Sage. The name of this plant’s genus ‘Salvia’ comes from the Latin ‘Salvare’ meaning ‘to save, or to heal.’ The plant has long been used medicinally with examples from Ancient Greece and Rome and throughout the Middle Ages where it was commonly grown around monasteries for its healing properties.

Even its culinary uses; teaming sage with rich foods (in particular meats) hint at its medicinal properties. Helping the digestion of rich foods, Sage is a tonic for the liver and aids with indigestion, bloating and flatulence.

Rich with antioxidants, the anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties of a Sage tea or gargle can be soothing for sore gums, mouth ulcers and sore throats. Its antibacterial properties have been shown to be effective at reducing plaque build up too. Teamed with Rosemary and/or Thyme they can be supportive allies for coughs and colds and make a clearing steam for airways.

Modern research has found Sage to be stimulating for cognitive function too. Compounds within common Sage have been shown to inhibit enzymes that breakdown neurotransmitters in the brain and research is ongoing into the support this may provide for individuals with Alzheimer’s.

Traditionally sage has been used to help alleviate some menopausal symptoms such as excess sweating and hot flushes.


Ways to enjoy Sage

  1. As a culinary herb Sage can be added to meals to support the digestion of rich foods.
  2. Sage tea is an easy way to enjoy its many benefits. Steep a teaspoon of dried Sage or a few fresh leaves in boiling water, cover and enjoy after around 10 minutes. Team with Rosemary for memory and Thyme for soothing sore throats.
  3. Cooled tea can be used as a gargle for sore throats, mouth ulcers or gum problems. You may also wish to add a tablespoon of Apple Cider Vinegar into your gargle too for extra support. A fresh leaf can also be rubbed directly onto a sore tooth or gum.
  4. Dried Sage is an excellent herb to burn for its cleansing properties. Using either single leaves in a fireproof dish or combing the leaves into a stick, burning Sage has long been a popular method for receiving its antimicrobial benefits.

We always love to hear your favourite uses for herbs too, please feel free to leave us a comment.

When working with any plants it is important to do your own research to ensure they work for you. Sage is not recommended during pregnancy or for individuals with epilepsy. It is also toxic in very high doses.

Botanicals

Rosemary

As another warming evergreen, Rosemary is a wonderful Winter ally and complements Thyme extremely well. Both of these herbs bring great benefits to our health, as well as attracting wildlife to our garden during Spring and Summer months.

The name Rosemary is derived from the Latin – Ros marinus meaning ‘dew of the sea‘ as it tends to grow in close proximity to the sea in its native area of the Mediterranean.

Rosemary is a circulatory stimulant that increases blood flow to the brain. It has long been recognised for its positive impact on memory and cognition. Various research has demonstrated that smelling Rosemary improves memory and performance in mental arithmetic.

The stimulating qualities also benefit the hair and scalp, increasing hair growth and shine and its wealth of antioxidants support skin, heart and joint health.

As a nervine, Rosemary can help ease tension in the stomach and stress related headaches, as well as supporting mental fatigue, stress and depression. In one study, workers who began drinking Rosemary tea regularly, reported feeling significantly less burned out compared with colleagues who didn’t drink the tea.


Ways to enjoy Rosemary

  • Rosemary adds a delicious touch to meals – we especially love it with roasted potatoes and a vegetable stew.
  • Rosemary tea is a simple way to enjoy its benefits. Steep a few stems in boiling water. It can be drunk alone or combined with Thyme for extra uplifting support especially for colds and respiratory illnesses.
  • Inhaling the steam of Rosemary can be both uplifting and energising and help soothe tension headaches.
  • Rosemary makes a wonderful hair rinse. You can either steep the Rosemary in boiling water and use cooled for a final rinse or infuse the Rosemary in apple cider vinegar for a few weeks, strain and dilute for an extra nourishing hair rinse.
  • Rosemary makes a warming joint rub, when infused in a nourishing oil and rubbed into aching joints and muscles.
  • Rosemary has long been used as an incense, it has a beautiful aroma and can be burned for protection, cleansing a space or in remembrance of a loved one.

When working with any plants it is important to do your own research to ensure they work for you. Rosemary is not recommended during pregnancy above culinary use and is not recommended for use when taking certain medications.

Botanicals

Thyme for tea

The Winter months can be a good time to really reconnect with some of our evergreen aromatic garden herbs. This month I have found myself particularly drawn to using Thyme, so thought it would be nice to begin a herbal journey focusing on it.

Thyme is thought to derive its name from the Greek words ‘thymos’ meaning strong and ‘thyein’ meaning to make a burnt offering, highlighting its ancient use as an incense.

Thyme is rich in the active ingredient ‘thymol’ which has powerful antiseptic properties. So much so, the compound has been isolated and used in high doses in a range of commercial products including medical disinfectants.

Thyme is a warming and dry herb that has long been used to help respiratory conditions such as bronchitis, laryngitis, tonsillitis, asthma and mouth conditions such as gum disease. Its astringent and decongestant properties support the clearing of excess mucous from the body.

It is also celebrated for its support of the digestive system, helping with indigestion, diarrhoea, gas and calming the stomach, particularly symptoms of nervous tension in the gut.

As a nervine, Thyme has been used to help support physical and mental exhaustion, relieve tension, anxiety and depression and externally this warming herb can offer relief for joint and muscle pain, cleaning and wound healing.

How I like to enjoy Thyme currently:


  1. My favourite way to enjoy Thyme is simply in a tea. Steeping a few stems in boiling water for around 10 minutes, I enjoy drinking thyme solo, or mixed with other herbs or a spoon of honey. You can also gargle with this tea when you have a sore throat.
  2. Thyme can also be effective when used for steam inhalation to clear airways and uplift our senses. Add thyme either solo or with other herbs to a bowl of boiling water. Allow to steep under a towel for 10 minutes. Then begin to gently breath in the steam with your head under the towel for up to 10 minutes.
  3. I love adding Thyme to a range of dishes including tomato sauces, to roasted vegetables and soups and stews.
  4. One of Thyme’s oldest uses is as an incense. It can be thrown into a fire, popped on top of a wood burner or left to dry and then burned to obtain the healing smoke. I like to add it in to smoulder sticks. My recent Winter Allies Smoulder Stick was woven with thyme and other evergreens.
  5. The other way I have used Thyme recently is in a multipurpose cleaner, which is simply a selection of evergreens infused in white vinegar, left for 2 weeks and then strained and diluted 1:1 with distilled water.


We would love to hear the ways in which you enjoy using Thyme. As with all plants it is always important to do your own research. Thyme and certain other herbs are not recommended for use in pregnancy.

Wellbeing

Earthing

Earthing or grounding refers to making bodily contact with the earth through walking bare foot or sitting on the ground.

A recent review highlights the impact of earthing on our health concluding that ‘bodily contact with the Earth’s natural electrical charge stabilizes the physiology at the deepest levels, reduces inflammation, pain and stress, improves blood flow, energy and sleep and generates greater wellbeing.’

Further research also demonstrates a reduction in inflammation and pain in the bodies of individuals who implement earthing techniques alongside changes in the wound healing process and the immune response.

Now I have to say, I love being barefoot at the best of times, feeling the sand in between my toes on the beach, or the soft grass in my garden. During Spring and Summer there are lots of opportunities to do so quite easily, without looking too odd.

In Midwinter however it isn’t so common to see someone walking through a woodland without shoes on.  During our recent Winter Solstice walk through our favourite woodland I felt the urge to free my feet and get them on the ground.

After doing so, I immediately felt more awake. Pulled straight into the present moment, aware of the sensations under my feet (albeit mainly cold) noticing my every step. Energised, I made a commitment to get my feet on the ground more often during the Winter months and I certainly haven’t regretted it so far.

Is it cold? Well yes it is, but I am wrapped up and have a hot drink afterwards so it is certainly manageable. Other alternatives to connect with nature if you don’t fancy going barefoot during the Winter are resting your hands on trees as you walk past them, doing some gardening or having a sea salt bath.

Do you practice earthing? How does it impact you?

Wellbeing, Wheel of the Year

Winter Solstice

We have now arrived at the darkest day of the year in the Northern hemisphere. Energy and light levels are low. Today the sun stands still at its furthest point, before slowly returning once more with its light and warmth.

It has been a strange year, perhaps the strangest so far so we do hope you find some moments over this time to rest, and tend to yourselves.

Alongside our Winter Solstice/Yule Wellbeing Guide, we have also filmed a short Mindful Moment in Nature video which you can find a link to in the guide.

We have created these with love, to capture the peace we experience in nature and hope they support you too.

Botanicals

Mindful Jars

We wanted to introduce you to our newest creation, our Mindful Jar trio.

These little glass jars are full of homegrown and wild foraged botanicals intended to bring you a mindful moment at home, work or on the go.

Our senses have long been used in mindfulness & grounding practices. They offer us a route back to the present moment when our minds have wandered, our focus is lost or we are experiencing anxiety, worry or feel ungrounded.

By bringing our attention to what we can feel, smell and see in our surroundings unites us back to the present moment.

Smell in particular is a powerful sense and can impact our wellbeing. Certain smells can lift our mood, evoke positive memories or energize our bodies.

With this in mind we wanted to create a visual and aromatic aid that can support us with grounding and connecting with the present moment.


Our Mindful Jar trio includes:

  • Cedar to ground, protect & uplift
  • Lavender, Rose, wild Chamomile & Feverfew to calm, soothe & nurture
  • Pine, Lemon Verbena, Eucalyptus & Mint to revive, awaken & invigorate

You can find our Mindful Jar trio in our Etsy store now

Foraging

Foraging Resin in the UK

Wild Fen was born out of love and recognition of just how many healing plants we could grow and forage in and around our home in the Fenlands of East Anglia.

Whether it be for medicinal teas, infused oils and balms or making aromatic incense blends, our life long love of nature, evolved into handcrafted creations that celebrated the beauty and magic of the nature around us.

We grow or gather everything that goes into our products and this includes the resin in our incense blends.

Resin is an amazing substance produced by certain trees in response to damage. It has antibacterial properties and acts as a healing plaster that prevents the tree from further damage or infection.

Anyone that has had the pleasure of smelling resin knows it has the most potent scent as well as medicinal properties. It has been gathered and used as incense and medicine for thousands of years.

When gathering resin it is important to take it from the excess areas only, where it has dripped down the tree’s bark and never directly from the wound where it has a vital role in protecting the tree. Always remember that first and foremost, resin is for healing and protecting the tree. Any extra is a blessing.

Resin can be added to a loose incense blend of herbs and barks to increase the burning time of the blend or it can be used on its own, burned on a charcoal disc or used in a resin burner.

We add foraged pine resin to our Botanical Incense Blend and Cedar resin to our brand new Mindful Jars and Cedar Magick Incense Blend.